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20121014
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CSPAN
Oct 11, 2012 8:00pm EDT
both to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how your religion played a part in that, and, please, this is such an emotional issue for so many people many this country -- ryan: sure. >> moderator: please talk personally about this, if you could. congressman ryan. ryan: i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. my faith informs me about how to take care of the vulnerable, of how to make sure that people have a chance in life. now, you want to ask, basically, why i'm pro-life? it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course. but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about ten-and-a-half years ago my wife jana and i went to mercy hospital in janesville where i was born for our seven week ultrasound for our first born child. and we saw that heartbeat. our little baby was in the shape of a bean, and to this day we have nicknamed our first bor
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30pm EDT
religions and what's the extent of the space and hostility among the religions, how are matchal resources distributed -- natural resources distributed. it's generally not a good idea for all of the resources to be found only in one part of a large country. and things like that. so i don't want to overestimate the importance of constitutions or, therefore, to say, well, here's a constitution that's really worked because, no doubt, there would be examples when it didn't. let me be truly heretical and say that one of the things i like about many state constitutions -- and you find these especially as you move west, but not only in the west -- is the degree to can they allow some element of direct democracy. the united states constitution, 1787, was written by people who, not to put too fine a point on it, were fundamentally mistrustful to their core of democracy. james madison writes very proudly in the 63rd federalists that although the constitution is ordained in the name of we the people, that will be the last time the people speak more or less directly. otherwise they will speak exclusiv
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 8:00pm EDT
that has ever been a belief in religion. but this time i'm going to say, too, the christian part of her obama's history. they made him denounce fatter than they say he is a muslim. i believe he's christian. i've been to his church. and i believe that is what he believes in and i was christian and i converted to islam because i fell for women because it was more protective of their traditional roles of father and mother were the mother was allowed to be at home and have children with a protection of the father. and i thought it was a very positive situation for democracy. israel, i don't think we should follow their lead. they do not follow the christian approach. when things happen to them, i believe that's going to be a problem for americans in the future and we need to make their own decisions, even if israel says they are going to withdraw their support from all of these things because i think they are divine people and i think that his religious falsehood and i feel that americans do not have to follow that abraham was for all people and he was for all peoples children. >> host: wha
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 8:00pm EDT
in art, it is more personal, mo prayer than in the politics, religion, preference. it is just something that goes to the very soul when you say, you bought that? >> this is the first parish church in new brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of "uncle tom's cabin" that in many ways the story began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23. teachers do, by her account, sought a vision of uncle tom being with to death. now, uncle tom is you probably know, is the title charactercome to hear of her 1852 novel, "uncle tom's cabin." "uncle tom's cabin" was written very much as a protest novel to the slave block of which mandated in 1850 that anyone in the north, where of the abolitionists live, if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. and this was the bill that was seen as kind of a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. it said that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say the same, i am a person can hear you beecher stowe, name against slavery as a much of new england.
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4